Season of VAR howlers

After a season that has taken virtually a year to complete, the major talking point once again has been VAR.

Unfortunately, yet another season has passed us by with more controversy on the use of the system.

When VAR was first introduced, the idea was it would stop debate and get decisions correct. Unfortunately, since its introduction into the game it is still causing disagreement in the football world.

This season in particular there have been some absolutely shocking decisions that have been an embarrassment to the beautiful game.

Back in November there were no less than four instances of the worst possible outcome of the VAR system getting decisions wrong.

On New Years Day more embarrassment when Aston Villa’s Jack Grealish headed home after eleven minutes, but the goal was ruled out as it was deemed offside due to a striker’s heel millimetres ahead of James Tarkowski.

There has also been a huge amount of goals that have been ruled out for handball. Now if it is an obvious hand ball then fair call it should be ruled out. But what we have had constantly this campaign has been instances of players virtually struggling to get their hand or other parts of their anatomy out of the way.

The essence of the problem with VAR centres around two main points. Handball situations and offside.

We have had the most astonishing decisions go against the attacking side when it comes to offside or not. In most cases it has been not a foot but a hand or even a length of hair.

In my opinion then surely, you are either offside or not. The attacking player should always be given the benefit of the doubt.

There is also the famous line that gets trotted out week in and week out- “Clear and obvious”.

Throw in the amount of time that it is taking in most VAR decisions and you can see why most football fans- me including- are totally against this system.

It is clearly not working, but it is looking more and more likely that it will be here to stay.

If there are some positives to come out of the use of VAR, it is that on some occasions it has got decisions correct. In most of these it has been on margins of a very fine line. So that is something positive to come out of the technology and system used.

The system could easily be improved by this formula, which would eliminate mistakes by the VAR officials watching back at Stokley Park.

If Var has to be called on, then let the on-field referee go straight to the monitor and let him decide what the eventual decision should be. He can get help from the VAR officials, but the final decision should lay in the hands of the match referee on the field of play.

Yes, he may get the odd decision wrong but surely, he is the man in the middle who should decide on the eventual outcome. This has got to be better than waiting for a long time before somebody hundreds of miles away decides on a decision, which in most cases is totally wrong.

Otherwise what is the point of having a monitor which is rarely used. It makes sense to use it. Falling that lets just scrap VAR for good, this would be the simplest solution but because the system won’t get discarded, then let’s get the main official involved.

The wonderful game of football is for the fans. They want to see free flowing games of 90 minutes, not endless waiting on VAR decisions which interrupt the flow of the game.

For the sake of football, if we are going to continue with VAR then let us please use it to its proper use, or simply change the laws of the game. By doing so it would stop issues of handball and clear and obvious and would make watching of the sport back to what it used to be like. Plain and simple and easy to understand.

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