Category Archives: Brighton & Hove Albion

Premier League TABLE scores and fixtures

 

PosTeamPlayedGDPoints
1Liverpool (C)344992
2Manchester City345269
3Chelsea3417

60

4Leicester City343259
5Manchester United342658
6Wolves34852
7Sheffield United34251
8Arsenal34850
9Tottenham34849
10Burnley34-849
11Everton34-845
12Southampton34-1344
13Newcastle34-1543
14Crystal Palace34-1342
15Brighton34-1136
16West Ham United34-1931
17Watford34-2231
18Bournemouth34-2728
19Aston Villa34-2927
20Norwich34-3721

Latest Results

  • Aston Villa 0-3 Manchester United
  • Everton 1-1 Southampton
  • Bournemouth 0-0 Tottenham
  • Brighton 1-3 Liverpool
  • Sheffield United 1-0 Wolves 
  • West Ham United 0-1 Burnley
  • Manchester City 5-0 Newcastle United
  • Arsenal 1-1 Leicester City
  • Crystal Palace 2-3 Chelsea
  • Watford 2-1 Norwich City

Upcoming Fixtures

  • Norwich City vs West Ham United Saturday 11th July 12:30pm
  • Watford vs Newcastle United Saturday 11th July 12:30pm
  • Liverpool vs Burnley Saturday 11th July 3pm
  • Sheffield United vs Chelsea Saturday 11th July 5:30pm
  • Brighton vs Manchester City Saturday 11th July 8pm
  • Wolves vs Everton Sunday 12th July 12pm
  • Aston Villa vs Crystal Palace Sunday 12th July 2:15pm
  • Tottenham vs Arsenal Sunday 12th July 4:30pm
  • Bournemouth vs Leicester City Sunday 12th July 7pm
  • Manchester United vs Southampton Monday 13th July 8pm

You can see the run in and out assessment of the race for European Football here.

 

Premier League – who will escape the drop?

With the resumption of the Premier League season on the horizon, it’s looking increasingly more likely that clubs in the lower reaches of the table will have to face up to the danger of relegation. 

Despite the caveat of having no fans, a full season of Premier League fixtures are set to be played leaving little argument against relegation for three teams. So with the danger of the drop still present, which teams are in the most trouble? 

Norwich, of course, are currently the most threatened side. They sit bottom of the table with 21 points, six points adrift of 17th. It’s a large gap, but one that is still just about bridgeable. Despite facing Chelsea and Manchester City towards the end of the campaign, the Canaries’ run-in overall makes more positive reading. 

They face Southampton, Brighton, Watford and West Ham during their first six games back. Positive results in these matches could well turn the relegation battle on its head, and a recent victory against Leicester shortly before the lockdown will give Norwich hope of conjuring some form. 

In 19th, four points above Norwich, sit fellow promoted side Aston Villa. Since reaching the League Cup final, the Villains have lost all four of their Premier League matches – most recently 4-0 against Leicester.

Villa have a game in hand against Sheffield United, which is scheduled to be the first fixture back for the Premier League. A win would see Villa move up to 16th, but this will be a tough task against an excellent Sheffield United side who dispatched the Villains 2-0 earlier in the season. 

The run-in for Villa doesn’t gave any easier after that either, with matches against Chelsea, Wolves, Liverpool, Manchester United and Arsenal to follow. Their season then finishes with what could well end up being a final day relegation decider against West Ham. 

Bournemouth lie in 18th with 27 points, joint with Watford and West Ham above them. The Cherries arguably face the toughest run of fixtures, with Wolves, Manchester United, Tottenham, Leicester and Manchester City all on the horizon. 

In fact, Bournemouth will not be facing any teams below them in the table. The lowest placed sides they face are Southampton and Newcastle – seven and eight points respectively ahead of the Cherries and both look to be clear of any real relegation trouble. 

The Cherries not only face difficult opposition, but have no opportunity to directly gain any ground on their relegation rivals. 

Watford and West Ham – the two other teams on 27 points – face each other in a relegation crunch match scheduled for mid July. The Hammers also have another key match scheduled a few days earlier against Norwich, as well as their final day showdown with Aston Villa.

Results in games against their relegation rivals could well see the Hammers safe. Add to this the fact that David Moyes seems to have struck upon a cohesive and powerful combination up front with Sebastian Haller, Michael Antonio and Jarrod Bowen (they were very unfortunate not to get a result against Arsenal before the lockdown), and things are looking relatively positive for West Ham.

Watford, meanwhile, face some tricky fixtures against Leicester, Chelsea and Manchester City before Arsenal on the final day of the season. Their run in, however, doesn’t quite match the desolate landscape of Bournemouth’s with opportunities to gain points against their relegation rivals still available to the Hornets. 

Brighton sit in 15th with 29 points and despite a two point cushion above the relegation zone, they are by no means out of the woods. Like Bournemouth, they lack matches against sides in the relegation battle. The only team below them Albion face is Norwich who are already eight points adrift of Brighton, so it’s possible the match could be of little direct consequence. 

With six draws and only four defeats since the start of 2020, Brighton are proving tough to beat but are also massively struggling to carve out wins. They are winless since the 28th December 2019 and will need to be picking up all three points when they can to avoid slipping further into the relegation battle. 

One thing that should also be considered is the lack of fans, and how this might affect results. It was previously a topic open to debate but the fact that home advantage seems to have gone out the window in the Bundesliga seems to indicate it does have a large influence. 

Frankfurt boss Adi Hutter even commented the other week saying:

“teams with a high level of technical quality in particular are less dependent on support”, while also noting how a lack of fans can adversely affects sides lower in the division. 

At a glance, Aston Villa look to benefit the most from having a crowd behind them with a swing of 0.78 points per game (PPG) more at home than away. This would make sense given the raucous reputation of Villa Park and the Holt End. Villa’s home PPG swing is the third highest in the division behind Manchester United (0.79) and Everton (0.99). 

While Villa’s is the most stark, all the teams in the midst of the relegation fight have a swing of at least 0.5 PPG more at home barring West Ham with 0.27. This also makes sense given their questionable choice of new stadium. 

This would indicate that West Ham are less reliant on home support, so are less likely to be as affected by the lack of fans. Given this along with their bolstered frontline, the Hammers stand a good chance of staying up. 

Things don’t look so good for the Villains though, with a lack of fans looking like it could possibly be more of an issue for them. This coupled with their tough run of games could spell trouble for Villa.

Bournemouth also face a tricky run of fixtures but more importantly, do not face any teams around them so have little chance to make up ground on their rivals. They could also be set to slip further into the relegation quagmire. 

Watford will hope to draw upon Nigel Pearson’s experience from his great escape with Leicester in 2015, as well as looking to talented players such as Abdoulaye Doucoure and Ismaila Sarr. Gerard Deulofeu, however, is still likely to be out for the remaining fixtures. 

Brighton and Norwich are both tricky to predict. Brighton have had a long and slow slide down the table, and it’s difficult to see where it might stop or how far down it will take them. 

Norwich look like they might be dead and buried, but a good run of results in the games they have against their rivals could seriously shake things up for the Canaries.

What is certain is that there is still much to play for at the bottom of the Premier League. 

How can Home teams overcome lack of fans?

Could the way forward for football in England when it gets back to playing behind closed doors, consist of artificial crowd noise?

Well, daft as this may seem to some people, the English Football League is considering putting this to the Championship clubs, the majority of whom returned back to training on Monday.

One club, Bristol City are already discussing varying innovations at the club with Premier League Brighton also discussing the possibility of pumping crowd noise for their forthcoming games.

Already the broadcasters in Germany have offered the option of fake fan noise during RB Leipzig’s win at Mainz at the weekend, while Borussia Monchengladbach utilised 12,000 cardboard cut-outs of fans.

This begs the question, when the Championship along with the Premiership can get back to playing again? Albeit behind closed doors, do we really need the sound of fan noise pumped into an already empty stadium and cardboard cut outs as well?

Yes of course football will never be the same without actual fans at games, but remember we are currently living in a time when we must expect this practice never being seen again for a long time.

The thought of having artificial noise inside stadiums mainly to help the home side really isn’t working now. Take the Bundesliga for example. Since the restart of football in Germany, there has only been three home wins from 18 matches played. So, the theory of home teams having a big advantage even in games played behind closed doors simply doesn’t work.

Any games played behind closed doors offers a level playing field to both sides, and honestly, we don’t need pumped music, or fan noise during games along with cardboard cut outs of fans.

It’s certainly taken a little while for players to get used to the new experience of playing in front of empty stadiums, but they are used to it by now. They don’t need extra noise to improve their performances.

Fans will gradually get used to the sight of unfilled grounds with no noise. Unfortunately, it is a slow process of the way football is going to look for a long time to come. The message to football fans at the minute should be this, no noise and no actual fans at grounds is different, but in the present world we live in it has to be either this or no football played in front of anybody.

Article written by Peter Moore

Football to Return

The Bundesliga will resume behind closed doors on 16 May, becoming the first European league to restart following the coronavirus shutdown.

One of the games of the day is the derby between Schalke and Borussia Dortmund, Which should be shown be shown live on BT Sport. Champions Bayern Munich, who are four points clear of Dortmund at the top of the table, travel to Union Berlin on Sunday. Most teams have nine games to play, with the final weekend of the season rescheduled for 27-28 June.

The German Football Association (DFB) said the season would resume under strict health protocols that ban fans from the stadium and require players to have Covid-19 testing. About 300 people, including players, staff and officials, will be in or around the stadiums during match days.

This come as good news for all football fans who have been starved off live football since March. The question is now Will the English Premier League and other Leagues across Europe follow Germany’s lead?

Germany has a lower death rate than the UK from the pandemic and Clubs returned to training in mid-April, with players working in groups. The prospect of the Premier League returning on the same date is minimal as players need to re-gain fitness however it may not be to long until it is resumed.

Prime minister Boris Johnson is due to address the nation with a new message at 7pm tonight (Sunday May 10th), the message is expected to be ” Stay Alert” rather than Stay Home, the message could be confusing but suggests lighter isolation restrictions which could in-turn mean they think it’s safe to allow football to return behind closed doors.

In worrying news Dynamo Dresden, who play in the second tier of German football, have put their entire squad and coaching staff into two-week isolation after two players tested positive for coronavirus. Bundesliga 2 is also due to restart on Saturday, 16 May. Elsewhere a third Brighton player has tested positive for coronavirus. Brighton players have been training individually at the training ground and the club say this will be allowed to continue. Premier League clubs are due to meet on Monday for more discussions about their proposed Project Restart plan.

Crystal Palace chairman Steve Parish says that unless Premier League clubs can find a way to stage matches soon, it may be a “very, very extended period” before the top flight returns.Speaking on BBC One’s Andrew Marr Show, Parish said that initial plans for league matches to be staged again from June may prove unfeasible.

“We would be derelict in our duty if we didn’t find a way to try and bring the game back,” he said. “It may prove beyond us.”

At least three clubs – Watford, Brighton and Aston Villa – are opposed to the plan to stage matches at neutral venues under ‘Project Restart’, while club doctors have raised concerns over aspects of the proposals.

A previous wave of 1,724 tests carried out last week by the Bundesliga returned 10 positive results.

“The German example could provide a blueprint for us and clearly we can see some of the early challenges,” added Parish.

“They may prove insurmountable, but the concern for us is that if they prove insurmountable now then we may be in for a very, very extended period of not being able to play and that has huge ramifications for the game.”

Premier League chief executive Richard Masters has previously predicted a loss of “at least £1bn” if the Premier League fails to complete the 2019-20 campaign.

Parish believes that deciding the final league positions on the pitch, rather than relying on points per game or taking the current table as the final outcome, is preferable, even if conditions are far from ideal and this is something that I agree with.

Watching Football on TV even without crowds is something I am looking forward to in these times and Dortmund v Schalke is an exciting match to resume to.

Want to hear more about the return of football then be sure to watch our YouTube Podcast by clicking below.

How much of a difference will using neutral venues make in completing the Premier League season?

As football fans in the UK anxiously await when the likelihood would be of seeing some sort of action on the pitch, news reached us yesterday that the Premier League are reportedly looking into the prospect of staging matches at neutral venues to complete the season. However, understandably so, this has faced strong opposition from clubs at the bottom of the table, such as Brighton who were due to play five of their final nine games at their home base of the Amex.

Not only do the football authorities need to look seriously into this suggestion, but the prospect of no fans inside any neutral venue will seem very surreal.

It would certainly make a difference having very little noise inside a stadium- after all fans make noise inside a ground which generates an atmosphere that players feed off. Yes, teams would find it very hard to adapt to this strange setting, and with no sound level, would that not take out the competitiveness of the game being played. I certainly fear this would happen.

Something else to consider, imagine the scenario when a team score a goal, how will the player react without the roar of a crowd. Most certainly the celebrations would be muted.

Despite other solutions that have been talked about, as it stands at this moment in time, football looks to be on the verge of having to play behind closed doors for a long time. Fans are the life and soul of any club. Most will follow their team through thick and thin. Any player and Manager will always tell you that fans will always be the 12thman, but with the problems we are going through at this moment in time, for once football fans are going to have to take a back seat and be patient.

There has also been talk of going ahead with the matches with minimum movement and risk to the players.  This quite simply needs to happen, as the upmost priority in this debate must be the players welfare, safety and health at all times.

After all, it would only take a single player to be tested as positive for Covid-19 to send panic signals around the football world.

We all want to see the beautiful game at some point this year, but it must be done only when it is safe to do so for all parties involved.

Article written by Peter Moore