Category Archives: VAR

Should ex-pros help out VAR officiating?

VAR,  not for the first time this season, once again appeared in the spot light  following more controversy surrounding no less than three different incidents this week.

Incorrect penalty decisions were made by the video assistant referee in all three of Thursday’s Premier League games.

Tottenham should have had a penalty when Joshua King clearly shoved Harry Kane in the back, in their goalless draw with Bournemouth.

Bruno Fernandes won a spot kick, which should not have been given against Aston Villa.

James Ward-Prowse hit the bar after being awarded a disputed penalty against Everton.

With so many talking points raised about VAR, there has been a suggestion by former footballer Tim Cahill, than an ex-player should be involved to work alongside the VAR officials at Stockley Park.

Going forward, it would appear to make sense that somebody who has played the game professionally, and knows how players react in circumstances during a game, would know more than a referee, who in most cases would never have played the game before.

The only downside to this in my opinion would be would the VAR officials listen to what that person would have to say, take on board and put into practice.

Overall, on debatable decisions I am sure they would like some impact from the ex pro, but I fear that the final say on the decision would be down to the VAR official.

I am still unconvinced that they would generally be swayed by expert advice from somebody who has played and understands the game more.

It hurts me to say that I genuinely believe quite a few referees don’t know the game of football. It is not just about knowing the laws of football; it is also about knowing the game.

To simplify and eradicate even more controversy going forward, surely the on field official should be allowed to go and check the pitch side monitor, and then make his own decision.

All too often the man in the middle never goes ahead and puts this into practice. It is the VAR crew who in turn make their own decision, therefore undermining the person who is supposed to be referring the game.

My own solution to this mess would be simple really.

When an incident should be reviewed, let VAR tell the on field official how they see it.

The referee should then go straight to the pitch side monitor to make up his own mind and then decide what decision to go with.

The referee who is officiating the actual game must be the sole person in charge of events on and off the field, in my opinion.

Currently, it is a case of somebody many miles away making decisions that really should be made closer to home.

West Ham upset Chelsea in London Derby thriller

One team had wins in every match since the restart. The other had not received a single point.  It was the underdog, West Ham United that was able to come away with the three points against an in-form Chelsea side, securing a crucial 3-2 victory.

The Blues dominated the possession game in the beginning of the first half, but The Hammers were the first ones to have a threatening chance. 

Off a corner kick, the home team had thought they had taken the lead courtesy of Tomas Soucek. Ultimately though, VAR denied the goal after Michail Antonio was caught offside.

In the 41st-minute, Christian Pulisic was able to win Chelsea a penalty after Issa Diop conceded a foul in the penalty area. Willian was then able to convert from the spot to take the 1-0 lead.

The lead, however, was short-lived after Antonio Rüdiger made a terrible mistake and gave West Ham a corner. The home team capitalised on the chance and Soucek found the back of the net again, this time without any interference from VAR.

 

Six minutes into the second-half, West Ham were able to take the lead thanks to a goal from Antonio. After trying to draw a penalty, the Englishman bounced right back up and got his shot right past goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga. 

 

Later in the half, Pulisic won a free kick in the attacking half after a great run, which caused former Chelsea Academy product, Declan Rice, to receive a yellow card. Willian was then able to score directly off the free kick to draw The Blues level at 2-2. 

 

All signs pointed toward a draw between the two sides from London. Substitute Andriy Yarmolenko, however, had other ideas. On a fast break, Antonio was able to find the Ukrainian, who finished his chance with ease in the 89th-minute.  This secured a a potentially priceless win for The Hammers.

 

The victory helps West Ham move up one spot in the standings as they try to avoid relegation, heading to St. James’ Park on Sunday to take on Newcastle.

Chelsea, meanwhile, who could have taken sole possession of third place after Leicester City’s loss at Everton, will now fight to keep a Champions League spot at home on Saturday against Watford.

See the table below.

https://247-football.com/2020/06/25/premier-league-table/

What have we learnt since the Premier League resumption?

After the return of Premiership football to our screens, have we really learnt much about the League since the resumption?

Well, the wait has certainly been worth it some pundits have said but has it really been worth the build-up of over 100 days?

What we have learned already is that Liverpool are a step closer to their title dream. We are all having to get used to the sight of very few people inside stadiums. VAR certainly won’t go away and even technology has the odd blip, which leads to more controversy up and down the land.

As we are all getting used to viewing football as we have never seen before. One good talking point has been welcomed around the country. The sight of both sets of players, officials and team personal taking the knee in solidarity together. Such a welcome sight and fully applauded. It’s is so good to see the Premier League sending out a message to the rest of the footballing and sporting world that Black Lifes Matter.

Aside from Liverpool edging towards lifting the title, on just the first day back since the resumption, controversy reared its ugly head once again when Sheffield United were denied a certain goal when technology failed. Admittedly it’s the first time this has unfortunately happened for over 9,000 times the system has been in place. What a time for this to happen, as the Premiership was taking centre stage.

One has to feel sorry for Michael Oliver- England’s top referee- as he was trying to explaining to surrounding players that his watch didn’t make a noise to indicate that the ball had crossed the line. Not his fault but wouldn’t it have been more sensible that somebody in the truck watching pictures of the match would have seen that clearly the ball was over the line? That person in the VAR room could then have communicated with Oliver to say to him to check the monitor at the ground and make his own mind up about the decision. If he was allowed to do this, then make no mistakes Sheffield Utd would have been awarded the goal.

We also learnt since the resumption that Arsenal players are certainly struggling with fitness levels, having already seen a handful of players taken off through picking up injuries. Clearly the three-month break has affected them, which is a big concern of their fitness levels. Yes, every team has looked leggy at times which is understandable due to not playing competitive football for over three months but for some sides including Arsenal it begs the question, what instructions were the players given to do for training during lockdown and resuming back into training? Something definitely isn’t right there.

However, nothing has changed with the Gunners defence, which still looks as fragile as before the enforced break. Arsenal need leaders, now they haven’t got any. Oh, for the leadership chiefs such as Tony Adams and Martin Keown- who must be shaking their heads every time they watch Arsenal play- who must begin to wonder will this problem ever be rectified.

We also learn in the past few days how good a player Bruno Fernandes is and the return of a hungry Paul Pogba. I didn’t think I would ever be saying that for a long time.

Despite appearing to not be worrying about a haircut- Yes Roy there are mobile hairdressers around who will be queuing up to cut your hair- Hodgson is building a very dogged and tenacious side in Crystal Palace. Looking a very well-oiled unit, especially at the back, having not conceded a goal in almost six hours of football. Palace could be outsiders to possibly sneak into a Europa League spot come the end of the campaign.

The two W’s after the restart, Wolves and West Ham appear to be going in different directions. The Hammers are in a relegation dogfight, while Wolves are flying thanks to the brilliant duo of Adama Traore and Raul Jimenez – 23 goals this season and counting.

Another interesting point would be that since the resumption the sides struggling at the bottom of the table have really struggled since the restart. A fact that could be put down to playing home games with no crowd behind them to raise morale. However, you would have felt that with eight games to go, crowd or no crowd wouldn’t need to lift players, who know they have a massive battle on their hands to stay up.

To finish, although in most games playing with no fans present it is no material advantage to both sides, over the weekend in both Premiership and Championship games there were only five home wins out of 22 games played. When it comes to a derby match, it clearly will benefit both teams to have fans in the stadium. Take the weekend’s Merseyside derby between Everton and Liverpool. A game that was played with no passion and at times looked similar to a practice game. A lukewarm encounter which hardly got going. Not much commitment from both sides aside from a couple of late chances. This game desperately needed a full house at Goodison Park, which I’m sure would have given the game more of a feisty contest that normally happens in derby matches.

We must, however, remember that for the foreseeable future this is the way that football will be for a while. We will get used to it, with fan noise or not, carboard cut outs or not and drink breaks, which so far are amounting to a managers team talk on the pitch.

It is either this or nothing. I know what alternative I would rather have. Even if it means watching Mike Dean with that amazing grey beard and listening to Roy Keane bemoaning about Manchester United’s crop of current players. Welcome back Premiership, we really have missed you!

 

Hawk-Eye apologises after Goal Technology error denies Sheffield United

The Operator of the Premier League’s Goal-Line technology has apologised for an error that denied Sheffield United a goal during their 0-0 draw with Aston Villa.

Villa goalkeeper Orjan Nyland carried Oliver Norwood’s 42nd Minaute free kick over the line but the referee, Michael Oliver did not receive a signal to indicate a goal should be awarded.

Following this unfortunate incident, Sheffield United boss Chris Wilder said:

” I think the goalkeeper was halfway in the Holt End when he caught it” 

Hawk-Eye subsequently responded saying:

“It unreservedly apologises and acknowledged that the ball had in fact crossed the line.”

The SMART products company also said that it was the first time that an error of this kind has occurred since it’s introduction to the English game in over 9,000 matches. 

Wilder, who was seen walking towards Michael Oliver at half time also said:

“We went to Tottenham last year and John Lundstram’s big toe was offside and I was hanging around for 10 Minutes in the pouring rain to await a decision.  I don’t understand why I can’t wait for 10 minutes in Birmingham!”

The body responsible for Premier referees’, The Professional Match Official Limited (PGMOL) when asked why the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) had not interfered, said:

“It had not intervened due to the unique situation that the on-field match official’s was not getting a signal.”

Former Premier League referee, Mark Clattenberg has since told the BBC that VAR should have helped Michael and his team as they were not sure what was going on.

Clattenberg, who has refereed over 300 matches in the top flight, said:

“That this system needs to be more looked at and it aso needs to work along side the VAR and the Hawk-eye Team who work so hard together to come to the right call on the pitch”

The Hawk-Eye Company has subsequently said:  

“Hawk-Eye unreservedly apologises to the Premier League, Sheffield United and everyone affected by this incident”

In what was the first Premier League match back due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, the result leaves Chris Wilder’s side 6th in the League, while Villa remain in 19th.

Interview with former top referee Keith Hackett

Former referee Keith Hackett began referring in local leagues in Sheffield back in 1960. He gradually made it onto an elite panel of referees and eventually had the honour of referring at International level.

With the return of the Premiership, he feels that they would have learned a lot from how the Bundesliga have returned to action.

“Hopefully in these situations they will share information across the countries.” he said ”I think they’ve already made it very clear in terms of what players can do in terms of spitting, mobbing the referee and confrontations and they[referee’s] are looking for a bit more discipline from the players.”

He also feels that this is the right time for the return of the Premiership:

“If it had gone on a bit later the Premier League would have had a very difficult decision and as we creep more and more towards the start of the new season the window of opportunity to get the season finished was diminishing so I applaud what they have done, I think they are taking exceptional care in terms of testing the players and making certain they are ok.”

The main concern on the restart will be the fitness levels of players. Hackett continued:

“I hope we don’t have the same in Germany where there was a considerable uplift in the number of injuries which was rather surprising because when you have a crowd that raises your adrenalin as a referee and the players and sometimes they do daft things and now there might be that they are over-stretching.”

He also felt that the officials were not quite up to their normal high standard:

“In a game of football that adrenaline rush that you get from fans keeps you on your toes and I thought in one or two cases in the Bundesliga games the referees seemed to drift a bit and loose a bit of concentration on the odd occasion and of course referees can’t afford to do that and if they do they are going to miss things and if they do that we are going to get the wrong decisions.”

Hackett also feels that some referees in the current game are not up to the standard that they should be:

“There are some referees on that list that I think are very lucky to be on that list and there are one or two passengers I think that need to move on, they need to be put under pressure in order to sustain the very top quality performances the Premier League and the Championship require.”

Hackett refereed at the highest level in English football for 23 years and loved his time with the whistle:

“Refereeing of football matches believe it or not is not a punishment it is an enjoyment and I think I got a lot out of referring from a satisfaction point of view, health point of view, it got me fit and mobile and of course the challenges of going around the world referring and at home as well as seeing the introduction of the Premier League and seeing that for the first two seasons get established.”

He was also in charge of a memorable match between Manchester United and Arsenal back in the 1990-91 season which saw a mass brawl on the pitch involving 21 players:

“It took me more by surprise than anybody and I learnt from it.” he said “The one thing is that you just needed to prepare a bit more, then perhaps I would have known there was a bit of ill feeling in the previous game between Winterburn [Nigel] and McClair[ Brian] and if I had of known that in fairness I might have been in their zone having a word of encouragement rather than a threatening word, but it all happened so quickly.”

He retired from refereeing in 1994, but was soon back involved in football:

“When I left refereeing my intention was to leave it for good, but I got dragged back to become the PGMOL boss and we started to introduce technology.” he said. “I watched rugby and was very keen on introduction the communication kits, so we introduced them. I brought in art monitors for the training. I was sat in the directors box at Old Trafford when Roy Carroll dropped the ball a yard over the line and at the following shareholders meeting of the Premier League I put forward a case for technology. I was asked by former Fulham Chairman Al Fayed what would I change in football and I said goal line technology and his answer was go and get it then.”

What does Hackett really feel about VAR

“I’m a believer in VAR. When I was referee we had three cameras. The modern game is 22 minimum. What I wanted with VAR was a balance to say look give the referee another look. What I’m seeing with these lines been drawn along the pitch, the technology is not good enough to make offside calls to the fractions that we are actually seeing, and I think that is where we should follow the MLS. Let the VAR assistant have another look and judge it on what he sees on the big screen. If he gets it wrong it’s far better to get it wrong that way than technology that is telling us it’s right, when generally I think we know that it is not.”

Click below to listen to the full interview with Keith Hackett: